Tolleson’s Social Media Campaign for GWWI

IMG_5838The New Global Citizens team at Tolleson Union High School is continuing to actively advocate for the Global Women’s Water Initiative (GWWI). Team leaders Aneyssa, Malak, and Ronae, have worked hard to educate their campus and community about their project. They have held many successful fundraising and educational events, including an Awareness Week, a Documentary Night, and a Poetry Night. For the remainder of the school year, the team has come up with a new, creative idea to continue to educate their peers: an Instagram campaign!

Tolleson NGC is taking advantage of social media to educate more people about their sponsored project, the Global Women’s Water Initiative. The campaign, currently underway, encourages students to learn about GWWI through sharing pictures on Instagram. In the campaign, titled with the hashtag “#wateryoudoing,” participants are to take a picture with the NGC Instagram frame provided at the team’s lunchtime table, or with something New Global Citizens related. Then, participants are to post that picture on Instagram, captioned with a fact about the Tolleson team’s project, GWWI. Only photos tagging the Tolleson NGC Instagram (@tollesonngc) and including the hashtag #wateryoudoing are eligible for the contest. The participants must also challenge a friends to make a post for the contest, and the top 3 posts, determined by the number of likes, will win! The winners will be announces on Tuesday, March 31st, and will be awarded with awesome prizes.

This campaign is effective because it does two key things. First, it allows the team to extend their advocacy beyond their surrounding community, giving the potential to educate many more people through the power and reach of social media. Second, it not only encourages students to learn about GWWI, but it encourages them to take it upon themselves to spread information to their peers, giving every participant the agency to be a part of educating a community.

This post was written by NGC Team Mentor Kirstyn Rowen.

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A Path Appears: Violence and Solutions (Part III) Review

Photo: Kennedy and Jessica Odede (http://apathappears.org/)

Photo: Kennedy and Jessica Odede (http://apathappears.org/)

The NGC staff started the Documentary/Book Club to review resources we utilize in our programs and to find new ways to learn more about global issues. Feel free to email the reviewer (contact info below) if you have any follow-up questions!

“It’s not about one person who receives the abuse, but everyone else around them.”

Who should watch: High school students (with parental consent) and adults

Why it’s important: The third installment of the A Path Appears series highlights the connection between poverty and gender-based violence that is faced by countless across the globe.

What Maggie thought: A Path Appears: Violence and Solutions is a must-see and worthy follow-up to WuDunn and Kristof’s Half the Sky (documentary and film). In this final episode, viewers learn about gender-based violence in Atlanta, Georgia and Kibera, Kenya, as well as organizations in these places that are working to solve this problem at a local level.

Though Atlanta and Kibera are quite different in government infrastructure, financial opportunity, and education systems, gender-based violence (domestic abuse and rape) exist in both communities. Women from all backgrounds face these threats, especially those of marginalized, impoverished populations. However, organizations like Men Stopping Violence and Shining Hope (founded by Kennedy and Jessica Odede) are proof that local leaders can make change one individual at a time. Education, public health campaigns, and counseling support this change which will slowly transform a community. By bringing this issue to the forefront of public conversation, gender-based violence can be eliminated from our culture.

After finishing this series, my only complaint is the lack of examples from Asia. Half the Sky shared stories from this region, but I think this film would have also benefitted from this focus.

With that being said, I believe the individuals and organizations highlighted were prime examples of how to attack the root causes of a problem in order to find sustainable, locally-led solutions. I look forward to the next film and book written by WuDunn and Kristoff.

Did you get the chance to see this episode? If so, what did you think?

Maggie Broderick, NGC Development & Operations Manager, reviewed A Path Appears to learn more about her click here.

A Path Appears: Breaking the Cycle of Poverty (Part II) Review

Photo: http://apathappears.org/

Photo: Madame Rea (http://apathappears.org/)

The NGC staff started the Documentary/Book Club to review resources we utilize in our programs and to find new ways to learn more about global issues. Feel free to email the reviewer (contact info below) if you have any follow-up questions!

“Talent is universal, opportunity is not.”

Who should watch: High school students (with parental consent) and adults

Why it’s important: The second installment of the A Path Appears series explores the connections between poverty and other barriers (education, healthcare, etc.) that are faced by countless across the globe.

What Maggie thought: A Path Appears: Breaking the Cycle of Poverty is a must-see and worthy follow-up to WuDunn and Kristof’s Half the Sky (documentary and film). This episode sheds light on the challenges faced by individuals living in extreme poverty in the U.S. (specifically West Virginia), Haiti, and Colombia.

The first location for this installment is in West Virginia, which is one of the poorest regions of the United States because of coal mines closing, manufacturing plants moving, and an overall lack of available jobs. As Jennifer Garner (native to the area) explains, “Poverty is not about not having money, but it’s about not having hope.” Kristof and Garner introduce us to Lynn, a young mother who is doing all she can to stop the cycle of poverty with her daughter by making education a priority. This part of the episode will be eyeopening for most who have not seen such extreme poverty in the United States.

Next, Kristof is off to Haiti to explore the history of aid and its impact on the country’s economic opportunities. Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, but the presence of countless development organizations has not changed its course. Kristof meets Madame Rea, a woman who runs a school for every child, no matter their financial situation. (In Haiti there is no public school system.) Madame Rea is an advocate for her students, which viewers see when she fights for the safety of a student who is a restavek (child slave). Madame Rea and her fellow Haitians prove that locally-led solutions are the best solutions.

Kristof wraps up this episode in Colombia to share how the Fundación Juan Felipe Gomez Escobar is providing opportunities for teen mothers. Young women in the program have access to job training, counseling, healthcare, and more. Fundación Juanfe is working to empower young women with children while also educating girls on how to stop the cycle of teenage pregnancy (and extreme poverty) in their community. This organization is a great example of a holistic approach to tackling a complicated problem.

Did you get the chance to see this episode? If so, what did you think?

Maggie Broderick, NGC Development & Operations Manager, reviewed A Path Appears to learn more about her click here.