The Things They Carried Review

The NGC staff started the Documentary/Book Club to review resources we utilize in our programs and to find new ways to learn more about global issues. Feel free to email the reviewer (contact info below) if you have any follow-up questions!

Author: Tim O’Brien

“They carried all they could bear, and then some, including a silent awe for the terrible power of the things they carried.”

Who should read: High Schoolers

Why it’s important: Deals with Global Issue of Armed Conflict.

What Gabi thought : Tim O’Brien writes this book from his perspective from his experience being a soldier in the Vietnam War. It’s written in a really compelling way almost as if he was talking to someone and sharing his experiences and memories as they come. It works to convey the desperation of being a soldier, the constant struggle to not get sucked into the awfulness of war, the lifelong effects of having been a soldier. But most compelling of all towards the end of the book Tim O’Brien shares that while his book is based on his own experiences but part of it is also fictionalized to better convey certain feelings from his stores.

Gabi Jimenez, summer intern, reviewed The Things They Carried send her an email with any questions at gabriela@newglobalcitziens.org. 


Tags: NGC Doc/Book Club , reviewer’s name, global issue

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The Yellow Birds Review

The NGC staff started the Documentary/Book Club to review resources we utilize in our programs and to find new ways to learn more about global issues. Feel free to email the reviewer (contact info below) if you have any follow-up questions!

Author: Kevin Powers

“There is a sharp distinction between what is remembered, what is told and what is true.” 

Who should read: 10th – 12th graders

Why it’s important: Deals with Global Issue of Armed Conflict

What Lisa thought : Kevin Powers provides a gripping narrative of a soldier in the 2004 Iraq conflict. This account is graphic, exact, and personal, incisively conveying the emotion involved in armed conflict and the aftermath of fighting in the lives of soldiers and those around them. Themes of PTSD, the emotional toll of conflict, and uncertainty of purpose are revisited throughout the novel. This novel can be a difficult read in terms of emotional content, but it leaves the reader with a greater understanding of the horrors of war and their long-lasting effects.

Lisa Glenn, Director of Programs, reviewed The Yellow Birds to learn more about her click here.

“Bang for Your Buck” Review

The NGC staff started the Documentary/Book Club to review resources we utilize in our programs and to find new ways to learn more about global issues. Feel free to email the reviewer (contact info below) if you have any follow-up questions! Directors: Seth Chase and Brice Blondel

“In the 4th poorest country in the world, one thing remains affordable to all: the grenade.”

Who should watch: High School students

Why it’s important: The documentary deals with Global Issue of Armed Conflict.

What Steven thought: This is a wonderful and short documentary that shows how weapons and violence are destructive to communities. The content is not visually graphic, but it does talk about deaths by grenades and other violent acts committed in Burundi. Talks about the negative consequences of having weapons easily available and the aftermath of an extensive civil war. Bang for Your Buck is the winner of Oxfam‘s “Shooting Poverty” film competition. Watch it here. To read more about where Seth Chase and Brice Blondel inspiration for their project click here.

Steven Rouk (steven@newglobalcitizens.org), NGC Intern, reviewed Bang for Your Buck.

#WHD2013: Commemorating ASU’s Save Our Syrian Freedom Activists

Linnea Bennett is a junior at Arizona State University studying journalism and political science. She is an intern with NGC this fall.

In March of 2011, protests broke out in Syria in response to the oppressive rule of President Bashar al-Assad. The protests led to fighting and the formation of a rebel army, followed by two years of intense violence and bloodshed. Syria’s civil war remains on-going as more of the country becomes engulfed in the conflict.

freedomsyria

Photo by Tarek Kaakani

On this year’s World Humanitarian Day, my thoughts cannot help returning to a group of students at my home university, Arizona State University. These students have worked tirelessly in the last year to bring awareness to a situation that touches their lives very closely, despite the fact that it seems worlds away from most of their peers.

The students are a part of a group called Save our Syrian Freedom. Many of the club’s officers and members were either born in or have much of their family living in war-torn Syria. While these young activists may live in a nation of prosperity, their hearts stay with a country ravaged by violence.

I’ve watched the members of SOS Freedom raise money, paint signs, stage silent protests, hold vigils and do everything they can to spread the word about the violence and crimes their country has faced. They never stop working, even when few of their fellow students seem to care, even when the media won’t pay attention.

These students remind me why it is so important to be a global citizen. They have taught me to think of global issues not as textbook conflicts, but as events and problems that are affecting mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, cousins and friends.

The world will always need more passionate, young activists like the SOS Freedom students, and I hope they continue their fight to educate our society on their country’s plight.

Cheers to SOS Freedom and the many world humanitarians on this special day.

Want to celebrate humanitarian efforts? Contact NGC about sharing a story on our blog.